to find such light

Art images, with contextual text where available,
collated from various sources by typefaceandintent.

For a random post, click here.

March 18, 2014 12:01 pm
slightly:

The interior of the 1784 Assembly Rooms with a ball in progress.
(via Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum)

slightly:

The interior of the 1784 Assembly Rooms with a ball in progress.

(via Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum)

January 5, 2014 12:00 pm

design-is-fine:

Thomas Sheraton, Metamorphic Library Table-steps, 1795. Mahogany. England. Via Cooper Hewitt.

(Source: collection.cooperhewitt.org, via crimescene)

November 5, 2013 12:00 pm

Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, on whose educational theories this specimen box is based, was advocating a holistic and child-centred approach to the education of the young as early as the 1790s. Pestalozzi advocated a radically different approach at a time when most teachers used methods which depended upon the written word and the ‘correct’ answer, and relied on punishment to make their pupils comply.

As well as suggesting that each child was an individual who should explore learning to find an answer, he insisted on the importance of the balance between head, hands and heart: the children should do practical things as well as study, and their education should be the route to social justice and freedom. He founded two experimetal schools which failed, but the crucial experience in developing his theories seems to have been his work with orphans whose parents had been killed during the Franco-Swiss wars of the 1790s. It was necessary to communicate with these traumatised children at a more personal level, and to base their education on their own knowledge and experience of life.

Although his work is now perhaps less well known than that of some later educational reformers such as Friedrich Froebel and Maria Montessori, his importance was recognised in using his name for the Pestalozzi children’s villages which were set up after the Second World War of 1939-45, to care for refugee children. The Pestalozzi International Village Trust’s work is currently offering educational opportunities to children from developing countries. [V&A]

Educational specimen box, c.1850.

June 23, 2013 12:01 pm
James Stark (1794‑1859), A Hillside Covered with Gorse-Scrub.

James Stark (1794‑1859), A Hillside Covered with Gorse-Scrub.

(Source: tate.org.uk)

April 10, 2013 12:00 pm
Heneage Finch, Fourth Earl of Aylesford, The Handel Celebration in Westminster Abbey, 1784

Heneage Finch, Fourth Earl of Aylesford, The Handel Celebration in Westminster Abbey, 1784

(Source: tate.org.uk)

April 2, 2013 8:00 am
Russian vodka cup, silver, maker unknown, 1751.

Russian vodka cup, silver, maker unknown, 1751.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

January 30, 2013 4:00 pm
Gothic revival style chair designed by Richard Bentley for Horace Walpole's country residence, Strawberry Hill, and made by William Hallett, 1755.

Gothic revival style chair designed by Richard Bentley for Horace Walpole's country residence, Strawberry Hill, and made by William Hallett, 1755.

January 14, 2013 9:20 pm
Ramsay Richard Reinagle, portrait of John Constable, oil on canvas, c.1799.

Ramsay Richard Reinagle, portrait of John Constable, oil on canvas, c.1799.

January 7, 2013 12:00 pm
lostsplendor:

Stomacher, c. 1760s, Switzerland.  Source: Kyoto Costume Institute.

lostsplendor:

Stomacher, c. 1760s, Switzerland.  Source: Kyoto Costume Institute.

(via lostsplendor)

September 29, 2012 6:44 am

This house is named after Denton Welch (1915-1948) who was a famous artist and writer. He was seriously injured in 1935 and it was during his convalescence that he put his artistic talents to good use restoring this house which had been stored in a friend’s cellar. The house was in very bad condition. He found the date when it had been made, 1783, by the kitchen fireplace under a layer of paint together with the initials M.J.D. Despite the neglect suffered, the house had retained many of its original features, in particular the mantlepieces in each room and the perfect moulded cornices and door frames, the doors themselves being two panelled. Underneath the many layers of paint Denton Welch found the small red bricks which were originally painted on the house. He was probably responsible for decorating the fanlight which was usually painted or left plain in houses of the period. The stairs are made of oak with replacement balusters. As with most 18th century houses the central panel is fixed, with a door opening on each side. The house also has a pediment and balustrade running along the top, both typical of the period.

This house is named after Denton Welch (1915-1948) who was a famous artist and writer. He was seriously injured in 1935 and it was during his convalescence that he put his artistic talents to good use restoring this house which had been stored in a friend’s cellar. The house was in very bad condition. He found the date when it had been made, 1783, by the kitchen fireplace under a layer of paint together with the initials M.J.D. Despite the neglect suffered, the house had retained many of its original features, in particular the mantlepieces in each room and the perfect moulded cornices and door frames, the doors themselves being two panelled. Underneath the many layers of paint Denton Welch found the small red bricks which were originally painted on the house. He was probably responsible for decorating the fanlight which was usually painted or left plain in houses of the period. The stairs are made of oak with replacement balusters. As with most 18th century houses the central panel is fixed, with a door opening on each side. The house also has a pediment and balustrade running along the top, both typical of the period.