to find such light

Art images, with contextual text where available,
collated from various sources by typefaceandintent.

For a random post, click here.

September 25, 2014 12:00 pm
John Scarlett Davis, Paris: Entrance to the Church of St Germain des Prés, 1831.

John Scarlett Davis, Paris: Entrance to the Church of St Germain des Prés, 1831.

(Source: tate.org.uk)

September 24, 2014 12:00 pm
Pair of brooches with gold frames enclosing silhouettes by John Miers, England, 1810-35.

Pair of brooches with gold frames enclosing silhouettes by John Miers, England, 1810-35.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

September 23, 2014 12:00 pm
Vincent van Gogh, Postman Joseph Roulin, 1888.

Vincent van Gogh, Postman Joseph Roulin1888.

(Source: mfa.org)

September 15, 2014 2:26 am
Gold earring of thin sheet gold, from 19th century Venice.

Gold earring of thin sheet gold, from 19th century Venice.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

June 18, 2014 12:00 pm
Wilhelm von Gloeden, Sicilian dress (a boy disguised as a girl), circa 1895.

Wilhelm von Gloeden, Sicilian dress (a boy disguised as a girl), circa 1895.

(Source: theguardian.com)

June 16, 2014 12:00 pm
Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, The Water Rats, 1886.

Sutcliffe was a member of the Linked Ring, a society of photographers dedicated to promoting the medium as an art form in the late-Victorian period. The Water Rats provoked consternation amongst conservative sections of Victorian society for its depiction of nude children.
It is one of the earliest examples of using depth of field creatively in the composition of a photograph. [G]

Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, The Water Rats, 1886.

Sutcliffe was a member of the Linked Ring, a society of photographers dedicated to promoting the medium as an art form in the late-Victorian period. The Water Rats provoked consternation amongst conservative sections of Victorian society for its depiction of nude children.

It is one of the earliest examples of using depth of field creatively in the composition of a photograph. [G]

June 12, 2014 12:00 pm
slightly:

Aquaprint by Thomas Hulley, 1813.The Royal Crescent, begun in 1805-6 and completed in the 1820s.
(via Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum)

slightly:

Aquaprint by Thomas Hulley, 1813.
The Royal Crescent, begun in 1805-6 and completed in the 1820s.

(via Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum)

May 12, 2014 12:00 pm October 25, 2013 12:01 pm October 3, 2013 12:00 pm