to find such light

Art images, with contextual text where available,
collated from various sources by typefaceandintent.

For a random post, click here.

June 18, 2014 12:00 pm
Wilhelm von Gloeden, Sicilian dress (a boy disguised as a girl), circa 1895.

Wilhelm von Gloeden, Sicilian dress (a boy disguised as a girl), circa 1895.

(Source: theguardian.com)

June 16, 2014 12:00 pm
Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, The Water Rats, 1886.

Sutcliffe was a member of the Linked Ring, a society of photographers dedicated to promoting the medium as an art form in the late-Victorian period. The Water Rats provoked consternation amongst conservative sections of Victorian society for its depiction of nude children.
It is one of the earliest examples of using depth of field creatively in the composition of a photograph. [G]

Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, The Water Rats, 1886.

Sutcliffe was a member of the Linked Ring, a society of photographers dedicated to promoting the medium as an art form in the late-Victorian period. The Water Rats provoked consternation amongst conservative sections of Victorian society for its depiction of nude children.

It is one of the earliest examples of using depth of field creatively in the composition of a photograph. [G]

June 12, 2014 12:00 pm
slightly:

Aquaprint by Thomas Hulley, 1813.The Royal Crescent, begun in 1805-6 and completed in the 1820s.
(via Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum)

slightly:

Aquaprint by Thomas Hulley, 1813.
The Royal Crescent, begun in 1805-6 and completed in the 1820s.

(via Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum)

May 12, 2014 12:00 pm October 25, 2013 12:01 pm October 3, 2013 12:00 pm September 30, 2013 8:04 pm
Portrait of a woman in Cairo, c. 1885

Nothing is known about the woman in this picture, but the symmetry of her pose, revealing her white niqab and making direct eye contact, come together to create a striking portrait. [G]

Portrait of a woman in Cairo, c. 1885

Nothing is known about the woman in this picture, but the symmetry of her pose, revealing her white niqab and making direct eye contact, come together to create a striking portrait. [G]

September 19, 2013 9:51 pm
Roger Fenton, Cricket Match, 1857.
This image is the earliest recorded action from a cricket match.
The match was played between Hunsdonbury Club and Royal Artillery at Hunsdonbury, Hertfordshire on 25 July 1857. Roger Fenton had recently returned from documenting the Crimean War. He was one of Britain’s foremost early photographers, and established the Royal Photographic Society in 1853.
 

Roger Fenton, Cricket Match, 1857.

This image is the earliest recorded action from a cricket match.

The match was played between Hunsdonbury Club and Royal Artillery at Hunsdonbury, Hertfordshire on 25 July 1857. Roger Fenton had recently returned from documenting the Crimean War. He was one of Britain’s foremost early photographers, and established the Royal Photographic Society in 1853.

 

(Source: theguardian.com)

July 23, 2013 12:01 pm July 5, 2013 12:01 pm

J.P. Seddon (1827-1906) designed this architect’s desk, including the metalwork and inlay, in 1861 for his own use, and had the desk made at his father’s cabinet-making firm. He also commissioned ten painted panels depicting the Fine and Applied Arts from Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.
Ford Madox Brown (1821-1893), who also designed the panel representing ‘Architecture’, suggested the overall theme. The ‘Painting’ and ‘Sculpture’ panels were by Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898), while Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882) was responsible for ‘Music’ and ‘Gardening’. The other small panels were by Val Prinsep (1838-1904). ‘Pottery’, ‘Weaving’, ‘Ironwork’ (showing William Morris (1834-1896) as a smith) and ‘Glass Blowing’ are unattributed. Morris designed the decorative background for each panel.

J.P. Seddon (1827-1906) designed this architect’s desk, including the metalwork and inlay, in 1861 for his own use, and had the desk made at his father’s cabinet-making firm. He also commissioned ten painted panels depicting the Fine and Applied Arts from Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.

Ford Madox Brown (1821-1893), who also designed the panel representing ‘Architecture’, suggested the overall theme. The ‘Painting’ and ‘Sculpture’ panels were by Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898), while Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882) was responsible for ‘Music’ and ‘Gardening’. The other small panels were by Val Prinsep (1838-1904). ‘Pottery’, ‘Weaving’, ‘Ironwork’ (showing William Morris (1834-1896) as a smith) and ‘Glass Blowing’ are unattributed. Morris designed the decorative background for each panel.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)